Nutritional Testing

Cyrex Array 2 - Intestinal Antigenic Permeability Screen™

Research confirms that the root cause for many of undesired immune reactions originates in the gastrointestinal tract. GI tract abnormality can compromise the integrity of the gut barrier and increases the entry of undigested antigens into circulation, thus challenging the immune system. Reaction to these antigens activates immune and inflammatory cascades, resulting in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, an array of antibodies, and increased intestinal barrier permeability (or “leaky gut” syndrome).


Cyrex Array 3 - Wheat/Gluten Proteome Sensitivity & Autoimmunity™

It also has been discovered that wheat is made up of more than 100 different components that can cause a reaction, not just one (gliadin).

Until now testing for Gluten Sensitivity has only been against one of those components, alpha gliadin. Through extensive research Cyrex pinpointed the twelve components of wheat that most often provoke an immune response.

This new test greatly expands the parameters of gluten sensitivity testing, catching those who may have previously tested negative because they don't react to the alpha gliadin. A 'false negative' occurs when the (current) test says a person is 'ok' and they are not.

Array 3 also tests whether gluten has a drug-like opiate effect on an individual. Is gluten affecting your brain? Some people have enzymes in their digestive tract that break gluten down into opioids that act like heroin or morphine. Embarking on a gluten-free diet can cause terrible withdrawal symptoms in these people.

Another problem with opioids is they disrupt brain function by attaching to receptor sites normally meant for neurotransmitters. Neurotransmitters are brain chemicals that help dictate our personality, moods, behavior, bodily function, and more.

This opioid effect on neurotransmitter receptors explains why gluten plays a role in so many cases of ADD/ADHD, autism, or behavioral problems in children; or brain fog, depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, anorexia and migraines in adults.

Array 3 screens for antibodies to the opioids produced from wheat called Gluteomorphins and Prodynorphins.


Cyrex Array 4 - Gluten-Associated Sensitivity & Cross-Reactive Foods™
24 foods that cross-react with gluten or are newly introduced to a gluten-free diet.

Once a patient is properly diagnosed as Gluten-Sensitive or having Celiac disease, he/she is instructed to adhere to a gluten-free diet. Brochures, books and websites help patients with this seemingly difficult process. However, a significant percentage of these patients will continue to have gluten-like complaints even after being on a gluten-free diet for months. Most countries define “gluten-free” products based on the recommendation of the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations and World Health Organization. This codex alimentarius allows the inclusion of up to 0.3% protein from gluten containing grains in the foods labeled “gluten-free." If the sensitive body is exposed to 0.3% protein, the immune system will recognize and react to the protein.

One of the most frustrating scenarios for both the practitioner and the patient is when a gluten-free diet fails to have any effect on a person who seems so clearly gluten sensitive. Newer research shows this may be due to cross-reactivity.

In cross-reactivity the body mistakes another food for gluten and reacts accordingly.

This panel has great clinical significance as it explains why people still react even after giving up gluten and even dairy.  Some other foods tested include dairy (50% of people who are sensitive to gluten are also sensitive to dairy), amaranth, quinoa, buckwheat, coffee, corn, egg, hemp, millet, oats, potato, rice, sesame, sorghum, soy, tapioca, teff, and yeast.